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Browns Training Camp Preview: Specialists

Jul 28, 2015 -- 3:00pm

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/AP

(One in a series previewing Browns training camp.)

Extra Points …

Welcome, football season: About 20 Browns rookies – drafted and undrafted – are in the midst of a one-week orientation in advance of the opening of coach Mike Pettine’s second training camp.

The Browns joined the Ravens and Saints in opening the gates to the 2015 season first on July 22.

Quarterbacks and assorted Browns veterans began reporting on Monday. First Browns practice open to the public is Wednesday. First practice in full pads and uniforms is Aug. 2.

So we continue with our preview of Browns training camp – the position groups, the battles, the players to watch, the storylines.

Position: Specialists.

Training camp starters: Punter/holder Andy Lee, long snapper Charley Hughlett, kicker Carey Spear/Travis Coons, punt returner Travis Benjamin, kickoff returner Taylor Gabriel.

Reserves: Punt returner: Jordan Poyer, Duke Johnson, Gabriel; kickoff returner: Johnson, Justin Gilbert.

Analysis: No position group has undergone more upheaval than this one, and it comes at a time the Browns figure to lean heavily on field position, field goals and kick and punt returns to jumpstart the offense. Lee, traded for salary reasons by the 49ers, is one of the top punters of all time. He’ll be 33 when the season begins, but has shown no drop-off in his booming leg. Hughlett was signed last year during Christian Yount’s slump. Spear and Coons have shown they can kick with distance, but they are unproven under fire and accuracy has been an issue with each. If neither outright wins the job, it’s likely an out-of-work veteran would be called in September (Billy Cundiff’s number has to be on GM Ray Farmer’s speed dial). The return game was abysmal last year and must be upgraded substantially. Special teams coordinator Chris Tabor will audition a cast of thousands and claims to prefer having multiple returners. But finding just one last year proved a challenge not met.Tabor hopes that Benjamin will rebound after a horrible return year following his 2013 ACL surgery.

Top question: Will Gilbert be given a chance to be the No. 1 kickoff returner?

Why not? Looking back, not using Gilbert on kickoffs last year was a gross mistake. He had six career TDs on kickoff returns at Oklahoma State and his one interception for a touchdown against the Colts showed how natural running with the ball comes to him. I heard a variety of reasons for what happened: The coaches wanted him focused on competing for the starting cornerback job; they didn’t want to expose him to injury on what is considered the most dangerous plays in the sport; he wasn’t mentally prepared to play as a kick returner; he didn’t engage himself completely when given some reps at practice. Yada, yada, yada. The guy is a playmaker with the ball and he should be trained from the first day of his second camp to return kickoffs. Get him involved. I mean, at this point, what do they – and Gilbert – have to lose?

Noted: When Phil Dawson left for San Francisco in free agency in 2013, it left a void that has not been filled. Since then, the Browns have auditioned veteran kickers like Billy Cundiff, Shayne Graham and Garrett Hartley and young ones like Brandon Bogotay and now Spear and Coons. In two seasons in San Francisco, Dawson has made 57 of 67 (.850) field goal attempts, including 10 of 15 (.667) from 50 yards and more, and is 77 of 77 on extra points. In that time, Browns kickers – Cundiff and Hartley – made 43 of 59 (.728) field goal attempts, including 3 of 7 (.428) from 50 and over, and are 60 of 60 on extra points. Dawson, now 40, is expected to relinquish kickoff duties in San Francisco to Bradley Pinion, a rookie draft pick from Clemson who will replace Lee as the 49ers’ punter.

Other previews:

Quarterbacks

Defensive linemen

Running backs

Defensive backs

Wide receivers and tight ends

Linebackers

####

Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi

 

 

 

Browns Training Camp Preview: Linebackers

Jul 28, 2015 -- 12:00pm

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/ClevelandBrowns.com

(One in a series previewing Browns training camp.)

Extra Points …

Welcome, football season:About 20 Browns rookies – drafted and undrafted – are in the midst of a one-week orientation in advance of the opening of coach Mike Pettine’s second training camp.

The Browns joined the Ravens and Saints in opening the gates to the 2015 season first on Wednesday.

Quarterbacks and assorted Browns veterans began reporting on Monday. First Browns practice open to the public is July 30. First practice in full pads and uniforms is Aug. 2.

So we continue with our preview of Browns training camp – the position groups, the battles, the players to watch, the storylines.

Position: Linebackers.

Training camp starters: Paul Kruger, Karlos Dansby, Craig Robertson, Barkevious Mingo.

Reserves: Armonty Bryant,Tank Carder, Darius Eubanks, Chris Kirksey, Nate Orchard (r), Hayes Pullard (r), Mike Reilly, (r), Scott Solomon. 

Analysis: In Mike Pettine’s defense, the two outside linebackers are labeled the SAM (strongside linebacker) and the rush linebacker. The rush linebacker is the position opposite Kruger and that’s where the most crowded competition exists on the roster. Mingo, Orchard, Bryant and Solomon all are vying for playing time. Each has a specialty – Mingo has been lauded as the best coverage ‘backer, Orchard and Bryant are rushers, Solomon is best at setting the edge against the run – but none is well-rounded enough to be considered an every-down player. It’s possible that there will be revolving door at this position and three players can be used in specific down-and-distance situations. On the inside front, Robertson and Kirksey are considered almost co-starters by the coaches opposite Dansby, 33. But Carder, a core player on special teams, entered the conversation for more play time on defense as a result of a strong OTA season, per the coaches.

Top question: What is Mingo’s future with the Browns?

Entering his third season since selected No. 6 overall in 2013, Mingo recently earned a roster bonus of $1.3 million. He is not in danger of losing a roster spot, but his role in the Pettine defense remains a mystery. Coach Jim O’Neil said Mingo is the team’s best coverage linebacker – which is an amazing statement considering that pass coverage was considered a weakness when Mingo, a converted defensive end, arrived from LSU in 2013. Mingo was supposed to be a pass rush specialist, but the coaches don’t consider rushing the quarterback Mingo’s strong suit. In fact, they traded to move down in the second round for Orchard, who was second in major college last year with 18.5 sacks. Mingo played practically the entire 2014 season with a shoulder injury, for which he had surgery in the offseason. Yet O’Neil said that Mingo has to earn a roster spot at training camp.

Noted: Solomon was one of the most talked-about players at minicamp in June. Nicknamed “Bloodbath” by teammates, Solomon entered the conversation as a full-time player after opening eyes with hustle in the final two games of the2014 season when most everyone else was deflated. The Browns are Solomon’s fourth NFL team since entering as a seventh-round draft pick of Tennessee in 2012.

Other previews:

Quarterbacks

Defensive linemen

Running backs

Defensive backs

Wide receivers and tight ends

####

Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi

 

 

 

Browns Training Camp Preview: Wide receivers and tight ends

Jul 28, 2015 -- 6:00am

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/Getty

(One in a series previewing Browns training camp.)

The Morning Kickoff …

Welcome, football season: About 20 Browns rookies – drafted and undrafted – are in the midst of a one-week orientation in advance of the opening of coach Mike Pettine’s second training camp.

The Browns joined the Ravens and Saints in opening the gates to the 2015 season first on Wednesday.

Quarterbacks and assorted Browns veterans began reporting on Monday. First Browns practice open to the public is July 30. First practice in full pads and uniforms is Aug. 2.

So we continue with our preview of Browns training camp – the position groups, the battles, the players to watch, the storylines.

Position: Wide receivers and tight ends.

Training camp starters: WR-- Dwayne Bowe, Brian Hartline, Andrew Hawkins. TE -- Gary Barnidge.

Reserves: WR -- Travis Benjamin, Kevin Cone, Taylor Gabriel, Darius Jennings (r), Josh Lenz, Vince Mayle (r), Marlon Moore, Terrelle Pryor, Rodney Smith, Shane Wynn (r). TE – E.J. Bibbs (r), Jim Dray, Kevin Haplea (r), Rob Housler.

Analysis: One stat that best depicts the state of the receiver position: Benjamin had more TD catches last year (three) than anyone on the roster. Hawkins had two, Hartline two (with Miami), Gabriel one, and Bowe (with Kansas City) and everyone else zero. Still, the additions of Bowe, who will be 31 in September, and Hartline, 28, will enable Hawkins to slip down to the slot receiver role for which he was signed in 2014 but could not play because of injuries to others and the suspension of Josh Gordon. Bowe and Hartline also improve the team’s size at the position, but neither are going to dazzle with speed or quickness. Hawkins, Gabriel and Benjamin have the speed and quickness, but they measure 5-7, 5-7 and 5-10, respectively. Smith (6-4 and 219) and Mayle (6-2 and 224) have desirable size but are unproven. Pryor is the most intriguing candidate because of his size (6-4 and 223), his pedigree as an Ohio State and NFL quarterback, and the lateness in his career of the position switch to wide receiver. At tight end, holdovers Barnidge and Dray are proven players who can block and catch in intermediate zones, but neither is a threat to split a seam downfield like the departed Jordan Cameron. That role is set for Housler, a free agent from Arizona who was not retained by the Cardinals after he slumped to nine catches last year.

Top question: How much gas is in Bowe’s tank?

Bowe has been on a steady decline since his last 1,000-yard receiving season in 2011. The last three years in Kansas City, he averaged 58.6 receptions for 742.6 yards and 2.6 touchdowns. Bowe was with the Chiefs during GM Ray Farmer’s time as pro personnel director. Farmer signed Bowe for what amounts to No. 1 receiver money here – two years, $12.5 million and $9 million guaranteed. That’s a big jump from the $2 million the Browns gave Miles Austin last year, and Austin came through with some big catches in clutch situations before his season ended with a kidney laceration. Bowe has pledged to take advantage of his change of scenery (the Chiefs made him the 23rd overall NFL draft pick in 2007) and reward the Browns for having faith in him.

Noted: The last two NFL drafts were considered historical ones for the wide receiver position, deep with playmakers. Sixty-eight wide receivers were selected in the 2014 and ’15 drafts – and Mayle is the only one taken by the Browns. He has good size and athleticism, and had 106 catches in the Mike Leach throw-every-down offense at Washington State. A former junior college basketball player, Mayle had only two years of football at WSU and may not be an instant contributor. He arrived with a mending thumb that was broken in Senior Bowl practices but is expected to be fully healed for the start of training camp.

Other previews

Quarterbacks

Defensive linemen

Running backs

Defensive backs

 

####

Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi

 

 

 

Browns pre-camp notebook: Pryor slash role 'down the road,' McCown clearly the QB starter ... and more from Mike Pettine

Jul 27, 2015 -- 3:28pm

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/ESPN

Extra Points …

Observations from coach Mike Pettine’s informal chat with reporters on Monday

1. The Browns don’t want to bog down Terrelle Pryor with a “slash” role right off the bat, but it certainly is a possibility if he makes the roster first as a receiver. “I don’t want to put the cart before the horse with him,” Pettine said. “He’s got to make the roster. I’ve been a part of that before. With the Jets, we had Brad Smith (a quarterback at Missouri), who was able to wear a lot of different hats for us. I don’t think it’s fair to Terrelle at this point to cast him that way. I and Flip (coordinator John DeFilippo) certainly see the benefits of having that type of athlete on your roster. (And when it comes to needing an emergency quarterback), I’d rather have a 6-4 guy doing it than a 5-7 guy. That’s all down the road.” I asked why not throw him into the mix at backup quarterback, his natural position, rather than receiver and I got the feeling that DeFilippo doesn’t think he can make the team that way. “We’ve talked about it,” Pettine said. “I’m not going to eliminate that. I want him to focus 1000% on receiver. If the circumstances change, then they change.  I’m not going to close the door on it, but for now he’s a wide receiver. Plus, I don’t want a quarterback wearing No. 87. (Laughs).”

2. Nothing major changed on the quarterback depth chart after minicamp. Josh McCown is clearly No. 1, Johnny Manziel clearly No. 2 and Connor Shaw and Thad Lewis are splitting reps at No. 3. Pettine said he’s “not guaranteeing” that McCown will be the opening game starter against the Jets because anything can happen, but “it’s likely.” He said he has no idea when he’ll formally name McCown the starter for the season, but “you’ll have a pretty good sense of who our starters are going to be once we get to Preseason Weeks 2 and 3.”

3. Manziel’s independent work with ESPN analyst and former Tampa Bay coach Jon Gruden was viewed as a positive. Pettine declined to answer my question whether Manziel informed the coaches beforehand that he reached out to Gruden. “I think it’s positive. Any time you have a player that during his down time seeks out somebody well respected in the business to want to improve himself … the fact he sought out Jon and was thinking about football, I see that as nothing but a positive.”

4. All returning injured players should be ready to go for the start of training camp, but may be limited and managed differently over the first weeks of camp. The prominent names here include center Alex Mack (fibula), nose tackle Phil Taylor (knee), safety Tashaun Gipson (hamstring) and receiver Vince Mayle (thumb). “We have an individualized plan for all those guys,” Pettine said. “Everybody will be starting camp in some function. Some will be more limited than others. We’re just trying to coordinate days off.”

5. Pettine laughed off the ESPNCleveland column about a potential tug of war between himself and GM Ray Farmer. “I think it was just the late summer, slow news day,” he said. “The unfortunate thing is when you don’t win, there’s not much credibility there. You can take an individual event (depature of Farmer-appointee Jamil Northcutt, director of player engagement) and it has a negative connotation to it. The truth is, Ray and I work very well together. Do we bat 1.000? We don’t. But when you look at the roster moves made, we are singing out of the same hymnal on virtually every decision. To say there’s a rift, or a power struggle or a tug of war, that would be completely inaccurate.”

6. Pettine is not offended that they are the consensus pick to finish last in the AFC North. “I think there was one (preview publication) that had us fifth,” he quipped. “We’ll use it. But to me that also speaks to the quality of the division that we’re in. The Steelers are explosive on offense, (and) their youth on defense. Baltimore, it would be hard to place them lower than first or second. Cincinnati, all 3 teams are all coming off playoff seasons. How do you put us anywhere (but fourth). That’s fine. We’ll use that. I’d rather (everyone) think of us that way. Go ahead. That we’re a fourth-place team. To me that only works in our favor.”

####

Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi

 

 

 

Browns Training Camp Preview: Defensive backs

Jul 27, 2015 -- 6:00am

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/AP

(One in a series previewing Browns training camp.)

The Morning Kickoff …

Welcome, football season: About 20 Browns rookies – drafted and undrafted – are in the midst of a one-week orientation in advance of the opening of coach Mike Pettine’s second training camp.

The Browns joined the Ravens and Saints in opening the gates to the 2015 season first on Wednesday.

The remaining 70 Browns veterans report for their conditioning test on July 29. First Browns practice open to the public is July 30. First practice in full pads and uniforms is Aug. 2.

So it’s time to preview Browns training camp – the position groups, the battles, the players to watch, the storylines.

Position: Defensive backs.

Training camp starters: Joe Haden, Tramon Williams, Donte Whitner, Tashaun Gipson.

Reserves: Johnson Bademosi, Ibraheim Campbell (r), Pierre Desir, Darius Eubanks, Kendall James, Charles Gaines (r), Justin Gilbert, Robert Nelson, Micah Pellerin, Jordan Poyer, DeAnte Saunders (r), Brandon Stephens, K’Waun Williams.

Analysis: In the OTA season, players debated how good this unit should be in 2015. Top five in the NFL? Top three? The very best? Last season it led the NFL in limiting opposing quarterbacks to a passer rating of 74.1 (Buffalo was second at 74.5) and topped all secondaries with 99 passes defensed (Houston and Cincinnati were second with 95). Also, the Browns were second with 21 interceptions (San Francisco had 23) and might have finished first if Pro Bowl ball-hawk safety Tashaun Gipson had not missed the final five games with a torn MCL. We could attribute that to a steady diet of unproven or journeyman quarterbacks on the 2014 schedule (Blake Bortles, Derek Carr, Mike Glennon, Ryan Mallett), but the fact is the secondary was outstanding also v. the likes of Ben Roethlisberger (second meeting), Drew Brees, Andy Dalton (first meeting), Matt Ryan and Andrew Luck. The biggest change in this unit was the addition of Green Bay veteran Tramon Williams, 32, to replace departed free agent Buster Skrine. With Gipson healthy and playing for a new contract, Haden approaching his peak, K’Waun Williams and Desir entering their second seasons after showing varying degrees of promise as rookies, it’s safe to say that this is the pride and joy of Pettine’s defense -- clearly one of the best secondaries in the NFL -- and capable of impacting games against any offense.  

Top question: Can Justin Gilbert turn a 180 and play like a No. 8 overall pick?

Like fellow rookie bust Johnny Manziel – both of whom spent the 2014 season finale banished to the visitor’s locker room in Baltimore for team rule violations -- Gilbert talks a good game. At minicamp, he spoke of recommitting himself to his profession and redeeming himself in Year 2. The Browns are reacting to both with the same “show me” attitude. Gilbert spent some time in the offseason working out with Haden and arrived with 10 pounds of added muscle (he’s now 6-0 and 212 pounds). Truly, Gilbert’s physical gifts are what differentiates him from Manziel. Gilbert’s one moment of glory as a rookie – a Pick 6 of Luck in the 25-24 loss to the Colts – demonstrated that he knows what to do with the ball. He had six kickoff returns for touchdowns in his college career at Oklahoma State. Yet the Browns failed to tap that return skill set in his first season. If Gilbert does turn it around and approaches his potential as a cornerback, he could force the Browns to move Tramon Williams to the slot cornerback role (he did it on occasion with Green Bay). Gilbert’s length and foot speed make him an ideal press man corner in Pettine’s defense, which is why Pettine influenced GM Ray Farmer to select Gilbert eighth overall in the 2014 draft.

Noted: Gipson was so good last year in his third pro season that he earned Pro Bowl honors despite missing the last five games with a knee injury. As a restricted free agent, Gipson stewed about his restrictive status during the OTA season before reluctantly signing the Browns’ second-round tender of $2.356 million to avoid a minicamp distraction. Even though he arrived with a tweaked hamstring muscle that kept him out of all workouts, irking Pettine. At minicamp, Gipson said he was willing to bet on himself having an even better fourth season and entering unrestricted free agency in 2016. He cited New England safety Devin McCourty's $47.5 million deal over five years as a reasonable target. The good news for the Browns is that Gipson is supremely motivated to earn a big free agent contract. The bad news is that this could be Gipson’s last season with the Browns.

Other previews

Quarterbacks

Defensive linemen

Running backs

 

####

Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi

 

 

 

Browns Training Camp Preview: Running backs

Jul 24, 2015 -- 6:00am

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/Getty

(One in a series previewing the Browns’ 2015 training camp.)

The Morning Kickoff …

Welcome, football season: About 20 Browns rookies – drafted and undrafted – are in the midst of a one-week orientation in advance of the opening of coach Mike Pettine’s second training camp.

The Browns joined the Ravens and Saints in opening the gates to the 2015 season first on Wednesday.

The remaining 70 Browns veterans report for their conditioning test on July 29. First Browns practice open to the public is July 30. First practice in full pads and uniforms is Aug. 2.

So it’s time to preview Browns training camp – the position groups, the battles, the players to watch, the storylines.

Position: Running back and fullback.

Training camp starters: Isaiah Crowell and Malcolm Johnson (r).

Reserves: Shaun Draughn, FB Luke Lundy ( r), Duke Johnson (r), Terrance West, Glenn Winston.

Analysis: You can make the case that Crowell and West were a darned good rushing tandem as rookies in 2014 – a combined 1,280 yards on 319 carries (4.0 average), and 12 of the team’s 17 rushing touchdowns, which were fourth-highest in the NFL and most for a Browns team since 1986. So why did the team seriously consider taking backs Todd Gurley or Melvin Gordon with either of their first-round draft picks – Gurley was nabbed 10th by St. Louis and Gordon 15th by San Diego -- and ultimately use a third-round pick on Johnson? The obvious reason is Crowell and West combined for only 20 catches for 151 yards and one TD in 2014, and new coordinator John DeFilippo wanted a better receiver out of the backfield to reintroduce this ignored element to the offense. But DeFilippo also has indicated the desire to “play the hot hand” and lean on a feature back rather than a back by committee. As rookies, Crowell and West had issues with ball security (Crowell) and immaturity (West). So the Browns wanted a new man in the mix, and Johnson comes in as the all-time leading rusher of the running back-rich Miami Hurricanes. In OTAs and minicamp, it appeared that West had surrendered reps to Johnson and Draughn, a December pickup. At minicamp, Johnson sometimes shared the backfield with Crowell (or another back) and was put in motion as a receiver. A two-halfback backfield could be explored more by DeFilippo.

Top question: Will DeFilippo return the blocking fullback to the backfield?

Eric Mangini was the last Browns coach to turn back the clock and use a fullback in the traditional lead-block role. In 2009 and 2010, Mangini unleashed fullback Lawrence Vickers to produce big rushing games from Jerome Harrison and Peyton Hillis. (Incoming President Mike Holmgren later pointed out a commitment to running the ball is fine – as long as it results in wins, and Mangini’s teams won 10 games in two seasons.) As Oakland QB coach, DeFilippo watched the Raiders incorporate fullback Marcel Reece (6-3, 240) as a multi-dimensional fullback who averaged 40 receptions over three years – not as a traditional lead-blocker. The Browns had Reece in mind when they drafted Malcolm Johnson (6-1, 231) in the sixth round. Johnson was mostly a tight end for Mississippi State, but he displayed the versatility at H-back and fullback that DeFilippo wants. So, no, don’t look for a smash-mouth fullback to return to the Browns’ offense.

Noted: In 2014, the Browns signed Ben Tate in free agency and supplemented him with rookies West and Crowell. Part of Tate’s attraction was his experience and the hope he would serve as a leader and mentor in the running backs room. Tate wanted no part of that and eventually was released because of a sour attitude. Still, the intent was reasonable. The running backs room lacks an experienced leader. Draughn, 27, is the oldest, but has been with seven teams in four seasons and is more of a journeyman than a mentor to young backs. Crowell, West and Winston are entering their second years; both Johnsons and Lundy, who is 26, are rookies.

Other previews

Quarterbacks

Defensive linemen

####

Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi
 

 

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